Un Dia Sin Fronteras

La Injusticia Para Uno Es La Injusticia Para Todos!

Hartwell On Insane actions by ICE




 

Richard Hartwell

Guest Column

Action Dream Team


Saturday Night, His girl friend beside him, Christian Reyes is taking flowers to a relative’s daughter’s baptismal celebration.

 

Then it happens, flashing lights, taillight isn’t working, handcuffs, a crying hysterical girl friend must now run to the planned celebration to tell Christians mother, younger brother and little sister that the police have taken Christian away.

 

They can’t contact him. Sunday goes by, friends are trying to help. A lawyer is called. They don’t have an A# so they can’t track him. They wait. Sunday goes by, no word. Monday afternoon they get a call, expect a call on Tuesday afternoon. No word Tuesday.

 

Wednesday afternoon Christian’s girlfriend gets a text. “I signed the paper. They said if I didn’t they would hold me for two months in Tacoma and then I would be deported anyway.”

 

They go to the jail. He isn’t there. Where is he? Are they taking him the 700 plus miles to the detention center in Tacoma WA. Are they sending him to Mexico without word or even a goodbye? Stroke of luck, someone found him listed as being held in a neighboring county’s jail. What does it mean? What are they doing? When can we talk to him? Can’t sleep. Can’t eat. Can’t think. The world around them crumbles.

This is the scene, repeated over and over hundreds of times a day, every day.
 



 

On June 17th 2011 John Morton Director of ICE put forth a memo giving guidelines for the use of prosecutorial discretion. On August 18th 2011 Janet Nepolitano sent a letter to Senator Dick Durbin confirming the intent of DHS and ICE to follow the June 17th memo and review the 300,000 cases clogging the system and making the priority cases those that were criminals and not low priority undocumented individuals. To date local and field officers of ICE have thumbed their nose with comments like “We are completely unhappy,” Chris Crane said recently.



 

The head of the union that represents the country’s immigration enforcement officers, Crane has recently been on a crusade to undermine the intent of the June 17th 2011 John Morton Memo, and the administration. Ice has shown callous disregard and has instead tried to speed up the timeline to deportation by bullying and intimidating those picked up with no criminal record and whom they know would qualify for prosecutorial discretion into signing voluntary deportation papers.

 

This is wrong. It is time to show support for even small steps taken to try to give relief to hard working immigrants until such time as a do nothing Congress and a deadlocked Senate have the courage to take on and fix a broken and destructive immigration policy. I for one call on the Union head and it’s members to stand down and stop the insubordination.

 

Thank you Richard Hartwell from Action Dream Team for your fine article!  While the Obama White House may think it is in charge, the Department of Homeland Security has other thoughts.  They show little effort in following the directive written by the commander in chief.  Instead, they act of their own accord, ignoring directives from superiors, interested only in numbers and egos, with a heartless disregard for the lives they are tearing up.

When a security agency begins to take the rules and laws it wants and ignore the ones it does not want, the agency has become rogoue and out-of-touch with the citizens it serves.  Super agencies like this which are answerable to no-one, can have their way even if their commander and chief says it isn’t supposed to be that way.  Too bad.

 

Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) will solve many problems.  Included within CIR is the Dream Act which would allow young people to go to school or go to the military.  When we roll up our sleeves we can solve our problems.  When our government refuses to listen to superiors, it is time to give those who refuse to listen a permanent vacation!

 

 

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Dreamer In Trouble, Sigifredo, Richard Hartwell, Next On Un Dia Sin Fronteras


Sigifredo

Pizaña

dream-act

 Please Help This Dreamer With A Donation

Please stand behind a family in crisis

 

 

Sigifredo’s father is scheduled for deportation Sunday,

July 31st, 2011

 

The entire family plans to return to Mexico

Leaving Sigifredo here alone…

dreamer, dream act, sigifredo pizana, un dia sin fronteras

 

That leaves Sigifredo in the US Alone

 

A Dreamer who depends upon the Dreamer Family


Dream Act

Richard Hartwell from the Action Dream Team

Will join us tomorrow on 1150 am radio!

 

Please help Sigifredo as he prepares to move

to a new community

Sets up a new home for himself

Reapplies to college – He had to pull out of college

due to the current crisis

He needs travel funds to relocate.

He must move out of the family home.

 He needs funds to hold him over until he can find a job.

Sigifredo wants to go back to school.

 

He graduated with honors after taking AP classes

while in high school

 

Sigifredo wants to study accounting

 

 

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Tune Into 1150 AM Radio To Hear Sigifredo Live

 

Tell his story to Talk Show Host Tim Paynter

 

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Monday, August 1st, 2011

12:00 pm Mountain Standard Time

 

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Pass The Dream Act!

 

Dream Act, Sigifredo Pizana

Action Dream Team

 

 Please Help Sigifredo Pizana Stay In The US

 

If 1000 people donate $10.00 he will have enough money to safely move to a friendlier community, rent an apartment, look for a job apply for college again, and begin a new life with his Dreamer family.

Sigifredo is a brilliant student, a musician and a mathmetitcian

He came here when he was a child and will qualify for the Dream Act if it is passed, hence coming into compliance with US law.

 


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Manuel Guerro Casas Tells His Story – Un Dia Sin Fronteras


Manuel Guerra Casas Tells His Story

 

 


Manuel Casas Dream Act

 

 

Un Dia Sin Fronteras

 

Tim Paynter

En Vivo Por El Internet

 

Lunes, Julio 18th, 2011

 

 

1150 AM Radio

 

Escucha

Un Dia

Sin  Fronteras

 

 

A El Medio Dia

Mountain Standard Time

 

Immigrant Youth Flees Poverty and Gangs

 

 

Manuel Guerra Casas

 

In Deportation Proceedings!

 

a Roots Camp Star

 

Manuel Guerrero Casas

 

 

This Story originally appeared on Technorati as  Breaking: Deportation Of Future Catholic Priest

 

When Manuel Guerra Casas set out on the smugglers’ trail towards the U.S. from Mexico, he did so as a refugee. He was fleeing vicious gangs who demanded his participation or his life. He was fleeing hunger and poverty. He embarked on an epic adventure that could easily have cost him his life.

Manuel Casas is from a family of 12 children. There was not much work for his father in Guanajuato, Mexico. There were many nights when he went to bed hungry. By age 16, Casas was fighting for his place in a world with very few options. Mexican gangs were pushing him to participate.  Manuel didn’t like the violence or the bad acts Mexican toughs use to prey on the helpless poor. Yet, the gangs adopt territories. You join or you die.

 

Manuel Guerero CasasBeautiful for tourists, not so nice for the poor

 

You don’t say, “Hey I am out of the gang!” Casas told Immigrants2bfree in an exclusive interview Sunday. After coming to America, Casas has kept his distance from the gangs that wished to lead him down a dead end street in a country with few options for the poor.

With almost no options, Manuel decided to escape to America.  The route Manuel Guerra Casas took to cross the border is the same trip that cost more than 250 lives in the desert last year. The terrain is so barren not even poor Mexicans claim it for ranching or farming.  Plenty of men, women and children collapse on the rocky desert floor. Without water and food, and often lost, life slips from them.

Others are robbed by bandits and stripped naked. Like the Jews escaping Nazi Germany, immigrants often sew valuables into their garments, even their underwear, those who are fortunate enough to wear such an expensive item, that is.  The bandits demand everything down to shoes and calzones.   After holding up immigrant groups, the heartless robbers sometimes even violate the little girls before leaving.

 

manuel guerrero casasOver 250 people died in the desert crossing the border

Using black humor, one might snicker at the thought of fifty immigrants dashing across the border naked.  However, when you realize, without clothes there is no defense against the blazing sun and freezing nights. It can be a death sentence.  One Coyote finally got caught killing the travelers who had paid him for safe passage across “La frontera”. It was easier to shoot them. Years later, grieving mothers learned the fate their children suffered when the remains were found in a remote killing field. These are some of the dangers Casas faced when he fled Guanajuato, deep inside Mexico.

“We are almost there. We will be there tomorrow,” the coyote told the people.

The exhausted hikers fell off to sleep with dreams of food and jobs and family floating in their heads. Near the end of the next day someone asked one more time.

“How much further?”

“We are almost there! We will be there tomorrow.” The reply became the standard answer.

 

“There was not much food and the water was getting critical!”

 

On day four of a three-day trip, many were getting restless. There was not much food and the water was becoming critical. They pushed hard on day five, assured their hell would be over by nightfall.  By day six, agitation turned to fear. The food and water were gone. The Coyote had lied about a three-day trip.

By chance, the group found an old trailer. There were 12 Dr. Peppers inside.

“I never had a Dr. Pepper” Casas told me. “So this is what America tastes like. I love it!” He was a Dr. Pepper fan for many years.

 


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On the sixth night, Casas had a tiff with a buddy because the Coyote wanted to camp in the open.  It had been a difficult trip and Casas did not want it to end after so many days of hope and eternal walking. Casas told the Coyote he was going back to an abandoned cabin the group had passed down the trail.

Casas fell off to a deep sleep quickly. Around 12:00 p.m. he was awakened by voices outside the cabin. Dogs were barking! Someone shone a flashlight underneath the door. It was La Migra! The group had been discovered! They had come so far. Why did it have to end now?

 

“That is when I fell to my knees!”

 

“That is when I fell to my knees!” Casas told me. With tears running down his cheeks, the 16-year-old asked God for strength.

Casas said he is not sure how long he was on his knees in prayer. When he stood up, the dogs were gone. The flashlights and the voices started fading into the night.

Be careful what you wish for, they say. If his friends were arrested, Casas was alone in the wilderness.  There were no provisions and Casas didn’t even know what direction to go. The 16-year-old decided he would have to turn himself in or he would die. As he left the cabin, he heard someone whistle.

“Manuel! Manuel!” It was the friend Manuel had been annoyed with earlier in the night! When La Migra came, everyone ran, he was told. The group was re-forming nearby!

 

Stinging Quills and Yucca Spikes Slashed Through Their Pants

 

The coyote decided they must leave the smugglers’ trail and hike cross country. Stinging quills and yucca spikes sliced through their pants and cut their legs.  Several times they heard the clacking of a helicopter and fell onto their bellies in the prickly brush. On the seventh day the ragged party crawled from the desert and found the safe house in a Texas border city. The nightmare of the crossing was over.

Casas spent the first months of his life in the U.S., and his new love affair with Dr. Pepper, washing dishes in Texas. It is hard to imagine what a poor U.S. border town has that was not available in the Mexican countryside of his youth. Flush toilets. Electricity. A place to sleep. Plenty of food. Casas worked 7 days a week, 12 to 14 hours a day. His plan was to work two years, send money to mom and maybe save up for school, which is not free in Mexico.  Despite long hours, Casas wasn’t saving much money. At the suggestion of friends, he moved to Florida and had a chance encounter with a Catholic priest.

The church gave Casas a new direction. Manuel was told he needed to learn English and graduate from high school.

“My first days of high school were really hard.” Casas told immigrants2bfree. Other kids his age were graduating from high school at the same time Casas was entering. He had to complete four years of high school in two years and he spoke only rudimentary English.

“It was a big day when I passed my English exams!” a triumphant Casas proclaimed.

While in high school, Casas met a chaplain in the Marine Corp. who encouraged him in his studies.  Casas began to dream about serving in the Marines as a chaplain.

There have been some huge bumps along the way for Manuel Guerrero Casas, the deportation order being one of the biggest. Until Casas can clear his immigration status, not even the military is an option. If Casas marries a U.S. citizen he might qualify for an exception in the immigration law, but Catholic priests don’t marry.  People talk about “waiting in line.”  What they don’t realize is, for many immigrants, there is no line.  There are few exceptions in the law for Mexican youth.

Casas has been a leader for immigration reform, including volunteering with Students Working for Equal Rights (SWER). He also volunteered with students advocating for the Dream Act.

Under the Dream Act, if immigrant youth obtain a degree or serve in the military, if they don’t use public services including health care, if they pay out-of-state tuition rates, if they pass a background check and if they pay huge fines, which when totaled could add billions to the treasury, then they can apply as U.S. permanent residents after a ten-year period.  Without the Dream Act, Casas is not sure how he will remain in the U.S.

 

un dia sin fronteras, tim paynter, 1150onda

Sadly, a conservative Senate ended efforts to pass the Dream Act in the 2010 lame duck session.

“You are wasting your time coming to my office” said Senator Lindsey Graham (R-GA) while on the Senate floor. Many students left the Capitol in tears.

Graham said until the border is secure he will not vote for the Dream Act. Yet, conservatives refuse to vote for comprehensive immigration reform (CIR) which first seals the border and then resolves the problem of undocumented workers in the country.

 

“Time is running out for many youths!”

 

Time is running out for many youths waiting for immigration reform. At 10:30 this morning, Manuel Guerra Casas feared a judge would issue the final removal order that would bring his dream of becoming a Catholic priest and serving in the military to an end.

“I was saved by the computer,” Manuel exclaimed on his Facebook page. “The computer was down. They rescheduled my hearing.”

A 16-year-old boy who fled gangs in Guanajuato, Mexico wants his chance to live the American Dream. Whether or not he and thousands of immigrants get their dream depends upon the passage of legislation before a judge slams the gavel down for the last time.

Please support Manuel in his effort to remain in this country!  We must pass the Dream Act post haste!


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Stop Deportation Of Alberto Yañez – Dreamer Denied The Dream


 

 

 

Alberto Yañez

 

Arrested by ICE

Dreamer-Dream-Act-Alberto-Yanez-Richard-Hartwell

Alberto Yañez

 

Please help stop his deportation!

 

 

One more Dreamer facing life in a strange land!

 

 

Yañez, from Elma, Washington, is facing deportation.  “Going home” is not something that is going to be an easy fit for the 24 year old. That is because he came to the US when he was only a year a half old.

 

 

Sure, he walked here.  Not really.  More likely, he was carried on the backs of relatives.  But an unfair immigration system does not care this young person had no say in crossing the border or exceeding a stay under a visa or a thousand other reasons why they can deport you. 

 

 

 

Under our justice system, we don’t usually hold babies responsible for committing what amounts to an administrative violation of immigration rules.  Don’t tell anyone, but most babies don’t have a clue what the border is, much less how to cross it.  How can they be responsible for violating the rules?  Immigration says Alberto has to go home anyway.

 

 

Alberto-Yanez-Richard-Hartwell-ADT

Richard Hartwell


That is not to say Alberto is anything short on the brains department. In third grade, Alberto was placed into a program for gifted children.  He was taking AP courses while in high school competing against his US born friends who were also upwardly mobile.  After getting to Washington he enrolled in a program called “running smart”, which allowed him to graduate from South Puget Sound Community College only 6 months after graduating from high school.

 

 

 

 

Alberto-Yanez-evergreen-state-college-washington

Evergreen State College


Alberto’s next step was Evergreen State College where he completed 5 quarters while holding down a full time job.  It had to be that way.  Alberto is the father of three children.  He has a family to support.

 

 

 

Please Sign Alberto’s Petition

 

 

But starting an early family has not kept this youth from reaching for the American Dream.  Alberto started his own business so he would have enough flexible time to be a good father and go back to school.  He wants to be a pharmacist tech and has been studying at Clover Park Technical College.  Despite working his tail off in two jobs and taking care of his children, he got a B in one of his classes during his first quarter at Clover.  He managed A’s in his other three classes.

 

 

ADT-DIR-Dream-Act-United-We-Dream

 

 

Into every life some rain must fall.  For Alberto that rainy day came on November 16th, 2010.  Alberto was detained by ICE at his home.  That started a nightmare stay in ICE detention where he spent 30 agonizing days away from his family, away from his work and out of school.

 

 

 

Alberto’s next scheduled hearing is July 7th, 2011.  He may face deportation today.  His family and friends are asking you to sign a petition on his behalf.  Even if he does not get a free ride across the border today, meaning maybe his case might be continued, he can still use your support.  These cases tend to take awhile.  Strong community support is critical for successful candidates.

alberto-yanez-clover-park-ICE

Clover Park Technical College


Alberto is exactly the kind of case they are talking about when they say President Barak Obama should stop deportations of Dream Act eligible students.  These include people who had little choice, or worse, have no memory about how they came to the US.  Either they are in school or soon to be in school.  Likely, they have strong family ties to the US, including children or parents who are US citizens.  Imagine what a deportation will do to the future of three kids who could be forced to grow up without a father.

 

 

 

Please sign Alberto’s petition

 

 

 

Please sign the petition originally penned by Richard Hartwell, an activist fighting his heart out for the passage of the Dream Act.  Let’s just say, if you have Richard on your side you have a darn good friend!

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